Jan 18, 2023

Multiverse splits from human choices (rant)

Multiverse splits from human choices (rant)
Meta Description
Ship It Post #
202
Tags
Author
Date
May 8, 2022
Meta Title
Text
Excerpt
Tags
💭 Contemplations
Publish
Publish
Word Count
367
Meta Keywords
The idea that the universe splits for every choice we make is so stupid!
The tiny electrical signal in our brain, the switch of a neuron, to make a choice, would not have the energy to spawn an entirely new universe, duplicated in every way, even to the far reaches of the galaxy, save for the one decision difference we made.
Stats say a human makes 35,000 (remotely) conscious decisions a day. Multiply that by the almost 8 billion people in the world’s population. Scratch that, multiply by 117 billion total humans that have ever existed across history. That’s over 4 quadrillion multiverse branching events from one universe alone! And that doesn’t even take into account all the neuron switches of animal decisions. And each decision can have more than just two outcomes. Like eating 3 M&Ms at once, rather than 1 or 2. Then for each different decision that’s made, it opens up a whole host of addition possible decisions that wouldn’t exist in other universes. This means the number of multiverse branches increases exponentially. The amount of matter and energy this would take would be hyper-astronomical. There’s no reason to think that a human brain has that much power. It’s a very human-centric, egotistic idea.
Perhaps a possible way this would occur is if we live in some kind of simulation. If the simulation were programmed to simulate all possible decision outcomes, then each decision tree could be stored in some kind of memory. Maybe it’s like GitHub branches, where only the differences take up storage, rather than duplicating entire blocks of data that stay the same. It would not additional matter or energy of the physical universe, but the processing power and memory of this super simulation, which exists outside or beyond our representation of the universe. But this would not be centered on human decision making at all, but something more basic, something at the subatomic level. Like the random spin of an electron. Or quantum superposition. This is where a simulation of all possible differences would operate. One human decision would be a combination of a multitude of these changes.